Located in an isolated area at a 5 hr drive (160 km) from Leh, this 134 km long lake extends from India to China. Tourists mostly visit this lake during May to September with a special permit. The Pangong lake boasts of being the world’s highest brackish lake at a height of about 4,250 m (13,900 ft) from sea level. Villagers can be seen with their large herds of Pashmina sheep and long-tailed yaks. Despite being a salt water lake, it surprisingly gets frozen in winter. With such a wonderful location and a scarcity of oxygen, the Pangong Lake is a geologist’s domain too.

The lake is in the process of being identified under the Ramsar Convention as a wetland of international importance. This will be the first trans-boundary wetland in South Asia under the convention. Historically, the lake is viewed as being made up five sublakes, which are connected through narrow water channels. The name Pangong Tso only applied to the westernmost lake that is mostly in Ladakh. The main lake on the Tibetan side is called Tso Nyak (the “middle lake”). It is followed by two small lakes called Rum Tso. The last lake near Rutog is called Nyak Tso again.